• Politics
    HuffPost

    Trump Reportedly Considering Pardons For 3 Of His Children And Rudy Giuliani

    The pardons could benefit Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump and Ivanka Trump, as well as son-in-law Jared Kushner.

  • Politics
    The Independent

    Trump to boycott Biden’s inauguration and won’t even invite him for White House visit - report

    Outgoing president will not even invite successor to White House

  • News
    The Telegraph

    Nicola Sturgeon under pressure to top up £500 NHS 'thank you' bonus after PM tax demand backfires

    Nicola Sturgeon is under pressure to top up a £500 "thank you" bonus for NHS and social care workers after her challenge to Boris Johnson not to tax the money backfired spectacularly. One of Scotland's most eminent economic think tanks said the best way for workers to receive the entire sum would be for the Scottish Government to pay a higher "gross" amount, which would reduce to £500 on payment of income tax. The Fraser of Allander Institute (FAI), based at Strathclyde University, said there would be no additional cost to the Scottish Government as it controls income tax on earnings north of the Border, so the additional money would be paid back to them. In her SNP conference speech on Monday, Ms Sturgeon challenged Mr Johnson to create a special tax exemption for the payment, saying the Covid "heroes" deserve to pocket "every penny". After the Treasury pointed out SNP ministers had the power to "gross up the payment", Ian Blackford, the SNP's Westminster leader, accused the Prime Minister of trying to "punish" NHS and care workers. But the FAI said the SNP's exemption demand "opens the possibility of endless future lobbying for tax-exempt bonuses" and "would gift higher rate taxpayers a significantly larger tax break than basic rate taxpayers." In a damning intervention, they said there was a "healthy dose of politics" in Ms Sturgeon's challenge to the Prime Minister and what the Scottish Government "really wanted" was an example of the devolved tax powers "apparently not working."

  • Health
    The Independent

    I was given the AstraZeneca vaccine for Covid-19. I had side effects. I’m overjoyed — and confused

    I developed chills and a mild fever, and I was elated. This was it! But then reports about the data led me on an emotional rollercoaster. As I prepare to get my second dose, I’m reflecting on how far we’ve come

  • News
    PA Media: UK News

    Attack on teenager at railway station caught on CCTV

    A 16-year-old boy was sitting in the waiting room at York station when he was kicked in the face.

  • Politics
    Associated Press

    US Supreme Court asked to block Biden win in Pennsylvania

    Republicans attempting to undo President-elect Joe Biden’s victory in Pennsylvania asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to take up their lawsuit, three days after it was thrown out by the highest court in the battleground state. In the request to the U.S. Supreme Court, Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Kelly of northwestern Pennsylvania and the other plaintiffs are asking the court to prevent the state from certifying any contests from the Nov. 3 election, and undo any certifications already made, such as Biden’s victory. Biden beat President Donald Trump by more than 80,000 votes in Pennsylvania, a state Trump had won in 2016.

  • Celebrity
    The Telegraph

    'I don't want to hold George's hand': Sir Paul McCartney reflects on last meeting with Harrison

    Sir Paul McCartney has recalled holding George Harrison's hand in New York as he tried to console the dying Beatle. In an interview with the New York Times, Sir Paul described an emotional meeting shortly before Harrison died of cancer, aged 58, in November 2001. "We were sitting there, and I was holding his hand, and it occurred to me — I’ve never told this — I don’t want to hold George’s hand. You don’t hold your mate’s hands," he said. Harrison saw doctors across the world in the hope of finding a cure and eventually became disillusioned with all the travel. "He’d gone to Geneva to see what they could do. Then he came to a special clinic in New York to see what they could do. Then the thought was to go to L.A. and see what they could do. "He was sort of getting a bit, “Can’t we just stay in one place?” And I said: 'Yes, Speke Hall. Let’s go to Speke Hall.'"