• Celebrity
    Yahoo Lifestyle

    Prince Charles 'withdraws financial support' for Harry, Meghan

    Clarence House was previously in charge of handling any mail sent for the Sussexes. But that will soon change.

  • News
    Yahoo News UK

    COVID infections now rising in 55 areas – map shows rate in your area

    One in seven areas of the UK have seen a weekly rise in COVID cases, the latest government data reveals.

  • Celebrity
    The Daily Beast

    Harry and Meghan Are Begged to Delay Oprah Broadcast While Prince Philip Is Gravely Ill

    DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / Getty ImagesPrince Harry and Meghan Markle are being urged by some commentators in the U.K. to ask CBS to postpone the airing of its Oprah Winfrey interview, in which they are expected to mount a stinging attack on the royal family, as concern mounts over Prince Philip’s prospects of beating an infection.Prince Harry Tells Oprah He Left the Royals Because He Feared Meghan Markle Would Suffer Like Princess Diana Philip, 99, was moved to a specialist heart hospital on Monday and royal sources have been quoted by British newspapers saying the family is “pretty appalled” at the idea of the interview, which Oprah has said sees Meghan saying “pretty shocking things” being broadcast while Philip is so unwell.Penny Junor, author of Prince Harry, Brother, Soldier, Son, told The Daily Beast that airing the interview while Prince Philip was undergoing very public health travails risked making the interview look inappropriate, saying: “Anything could hijack this interview. Philip is ill. He is 99 and could die at any time. They were not to know he would get ill, but it could be seen to be the wrong time. But I doubt it is in their gift to postpone the interview. The control is in the hands of CBS and Oprah.”Robert Lacey, historical consultant for The Crown and author of the definitive royal biography Majesty, told The Daily Beast: “I think it would be a marvelous turnaround for Harry’s image if he took the brave step of canceling the whole thing this weekend—or, if that’s not practical, postponing it at least.”Royal commentator and former editor of Who’s Who Richard Fitzwilliams said it would “surely be appropriate” to postpone the interview.He told MailOnline: “Oprah is their friend and neighbor and would undoubtedly comply if asked and the gesture would I am sure be appreciated by the royal family. If an interview has been extended, as this recently has, it can also be postponed, as this undoubtedly should be.” Royal biographer Robert Jobson told the Mail: “With the Duke of Edinburgh clearly very unwell, the fact that the couple plan to go ahead with airing their self-indulgent, no-holds-barred interview with chat show queen Oprah Winfrey makes them appear heartless, thoughtless, and supremely selfish.“For U.S. broadcast network CBS, this interview is a coup, all about securing big viewing figures and big advert sales around the airing of their exclusive interview. So even if they wanted to Harry and Meghan probably couldn’t dictate terms to Oprah Winfrey and the network now. Too much has been invested.”A TV industry insider told the Mirror: “CBS has sold millions of dollars worth of advertising around the interview, but bosses are aware of the delicacy of the Duke’s heath. They have no loyalty to the royal family, although some feel as though they do to Harry and Meghan. For it to run if Philip’s condition worsened would be like setting off a diplomatic bomb. It would be grossly insensitive and hugely disrespectful.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

  • News
    The Telegraph

    Denmark strips 94 Syrian refugees of residency permits deeming Damascus 'safe'

    Denmark has stripped 94 Syrian refugees of their residency permits after deciding Damascus and its surrounding regions are safe for people to return to. Immigration minister Mattias Tesfaye insisted last month that Denmark had been "open and honest from the start" with refugees coming from Syria. "We have made it clear to the Syrian refugees that their residence permit is temporary. It can be withdrawn if protection is no longer needed," he said as his ministry extended the parts of Syria considered safe to include the southern Rif Dimashq Governorate. "We must give people protection for as long as it is needed. But when conditions in the home country improve, a former refugee should return home and re-establish a life there." Denmark's ruling, centre-Left Social Democratic Party has adopted a fierce anti-migration stance in a bid to ward off challenges from the Right. Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen promised to aim for 'zero' asylum seekers applying for residence in the country. Germany has ruled that criminals can be deported to Syria but Denmark is the first European country to say that ordinary refugees can be sent back. The decision on the Rif Dimashq area of Syria will mean a further 350 Syrians residents in Denmark will have their temporary protection permits reassessed, on top of the roughly 900 from around Damascus who had their cases reopened last year. By mid January, 94 Syrians from the Damascus area living in Denmark had lost their permits. Denmark's Refugee Appeals Board ruled in December 2019 that conditions in Damascus were no longer sufficiently dangerous to give grounds for temporary protection, without any additional personal reason for asylum. Michala Bendixen, from the rights group Refugees Welcome, said that Syrians in Denmark now faced "a very, very tragic situation", forced out of their homes, jobs or studies and into the country's deportation camps, where they face years in limbo. "They will not be forced onto a plane. So it means that they will have to stay in one of the deportation camps, where you don't have access to education or work, and you have to stay in the centre every night. The government hopes that they will go voluntarily, that they will just give up and go on their own." The opposition Liberal party, a Right-wing group, has also called for the returns to be sped up through a return agreement with the brutal regime of Bashar al-Assad, Syria's authoritarian ruler. In order to prevent Syrians being stranded in deportation camps, Mads Fuglede, the foreign spokesperson for the opposition Liberal Party on Sunday suggested a cooperation deal with the Syrian government. "I can imagine an agreement that will only extend to the framework for sending people back, with some guarantees that you can return without being persecuted," he told the Jyllands-Posten newspaper. He later stressed in a post on Facebook that by advocating such a deal, he was not suggesting recognising the "criminal dictatorship" led by Assad.

  • Sport
    The Telegraph

    Referee Pascal Gauzere admits he got it wrong with two Wales tries against England

    Joël Jutge, World Rugby’s Head of Match Officials, says Pascal Gauzere has acknowledged to him that he got both contentious first-half incidents wrong in Saturday’s Six Nations clash between Wales and England. Wales won 40-24 in Cardiff to keep their Grand Slam hopes alive. But there was there was huge controversy after Gauzere awarded Wayne Pivac's side two first-half tries. Jutge told Midi Olympiqe that he had spoken with Gauzere by telephone on Sunday morning and that the Frenchman was the “first to admit” he had erred. Referee's view: The officials will recognise they made key mistakes - we all have bad days “I think one has to be transparent, say what one thinks rather than let things fester,” Jutge said. “In this game there were two unfortunate incidents, which were not simple to manage. I know from having spoken to him by phone on Sunday morning that Pascal Gauzere recognises that himself.” The first incident occurred when Gauzere told England captain Owen Farrell to talk to his players about ill discipline, indicating “time off”, before blowing his whistle to indicate ‘time on’ and allowing Wales' Dan Biggar to take a penalty while the visitors were still in a huddle under the posts. Biggar kicked to the corner where Josh Adams gathered and scored.

  • News
    The Telegraph

    EU unity in face of coronavirus under pressure over vaccines supplies

    Austria and Denmark have become the latest EU countries to break away from Brussels' vaccines strategy, raising fears that the bloc's unity in the face of the coronavirus pandemic was crumbling. Chancellor Sebastian Kurz on Monday night said that Austria would work with Israel and Denmark on second generation coronavirus vaccines and “no longer rely on the EU in the future”. It is widely seen as a rebuke to the European Commission-led joint procurement scheme for vaccines, which has lagged far behind the UK, Israel and US, and involved negotiating for supplies as a bloc. Mr Kurz told Bild, Germany’s biggest selling newspaper, that the European Medicines Agency had been “too slow” in approving the jabs. "We must therefore prepare for further mutations and should no longer be dependent only on the EU for the production of second-generation vaccines," he said. Denmark's Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said that she had already bid for supplies of Israel’s leftover vaccines in another sign of the disintegrating confidence in Brussels to deliver the jabs. 7.54 doses per 100 people have been administered in the EU, compared to 31.58 in the UK and 89.99 in Israel. Austria has given 7.4 doses per 100 people and Denmark 11 doses. Mr Kurz is due to travel with Ms Frederiksen to see Israel's rapid vaccine roll-out up close in a visit that will cause blushes in Brussels. An EU diplomat said the joint procurement strategy was “born out of fear” that smaller countries would miss out. “That said if all the smaller chickens are leaving the nest it begs the question why we initiated joint procurement at all,” the diplomat said. "You can't have enough vaccines that are effective against the different virus strands," a second EU diplomat from a major member state said in Brussels. "So we should wish them luck - I guess." The European Commission's preference is for member states to stick to the joint approach because side deals sap the bloc’s negotiating power. EU rules allow national governments to approve and buy vaccines which are not part of the joint scheme, such as the Russian Sputnik and Chinese vaccines. Other EU leaders have already moved to secure national supplies of the vaccines rather than wait for the EU scheme, which involved countries negotiating as a bloc to drive down prices. Last night, Poland’s President talked to China’s leader Xi Jinping about a possible purchase of Chinese vaccines. Slovakia took the first delivery of two million doses of the Sputnik vaccine, which has not been approved by the European Medicines Agency, on Monday. Andrej Babis, the Czech prime minister, said he would not wait for the EU regulator before buying Sputnik. Hungary has already approved and bought Sputnik without waiting for the EU regulator and is also the first member state to approve the Chinese vaccine. On Sunday, Viktor Orbán, the prime minister, posted a photo of himself being vaccinated by the Chinese Sinopharm vaccine. Budapest has bought 2m doses of Sputnik and 5m jabs of Sinopharm. The authoritarian leader attacked the EU scheme in late February. “We’ve sought to do something together that we could have managed more successfully on an individual basis – take a look at the examples of Britain or Serbia,” he said. Regional leaders in France said they would try and negotiate directly with pharmaceutical companies in January but have so far had no success. Germany ordered 30 million extra doses of the Pfizer vaccine outside of the scheme in September. Berlin also has a separate order of 20m doses with CureVac. “We have all agreed that there will be no parallel negotiations or parallel contracts,” Ursula von der Leyen told reporters after news of the German side deals broke. A commission spokesman said that the joint vaccine programme had not crumbled and warned that emergency authorisations of jabs at national level could be risky. "It's not that the strategy unravelled," the spokesman said,"For our vaccines, we go through the European Medicines Agency because we want to ensure efficacy and safety. What member states do in addition to that, it's their responsibility." The under-fire European Commission president has repeatedly defended the decision to negotiate as a bloc, despite a row following supply shortfalls from AstraZeneca. She said the strategy ensured smaller member states had access to the jabs in the European Parliament in February. She claimed it would have been “the end of our community”, if larger, richer countries had snapped up all the vaccines instead of securing them jointly as a Union. Brussels has secured and authorised supplies of the Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca vaccines but the distribution of the jabs at national level have been slow.