• Health
    The Telegraph

    Manufacturing error clouds Oxford's Covid-19 vaccine study results

    Oxford University and AstraZeneca on Wednesday acknowledged a manufacturing error that is raising questions about preliminary results of their experimental Covid-19 vaccine. A statement describing the error came days after the company and the university described the shots as "highly effective" and made no mention of why some study participants didn't receive as much vaccine in the first of two shots as expected. In a surprise, the group of volunteers that got a lower dose seemed to be much better protected than the volunteers who got two full doses. In the low-dose group, AstraZeneca said, the vaccine appeared to be 90 per cent effective. In the group that got two full doses, the vaccine appeared to be 62 per cent effective. Combined, the drugmakers said the vaccine appeared to be 70 per cent effective. But the way in which the results were arrived at and reported by the companies has led to pointed questions from experts. The partial results announced on Monday are from large ongoing studies in the UK and Brazil designed to determine the optimal dose of vaccine, as well as examine safety and effectiveness. Multiple combinations and doses were tried in the volunteers. They were compared to others who were given a meningitis vaccine or a saline shot. Before they begin their research, scientists spell out all the steps they are taking, and how they will analyse the results. Any deviation from that protocol can put the results in question.

  • Politics
    The Independent

    Trump pushing through dozens of last minute policy changes – including use of firing squads

    Five more federal executions are scheduled in the weeks before Joe Biden enters the White House

  • Entertainment
    The Independent

    Joss Whedon’s exit from HBO series ‘undoubtedly a result’ of Justice League investigation, claims Ray Fisher

    Whedon said he is departing sci-fi series The Nevers as he is ‘genuinely exhausted’

  • Entertainment
    The Telegraph

    'He took the watch off in hospital and gave it to me': Paul Newman's daughter on selling his Rolex

    Now the stuff of horological legend, in November 2017 a Rolex Cosmograph Daytona ref. 6239, rocked the watch world when it sold at Phillips New York for US$17.8m – at the time a world record for a wristwatch (a figure that was surpassed in 2019 when a unique Patek Phillipe Grandmaster Chime sold for US$31m). The watch itself was a well-worn model of a highly covetable ‘Paul Newman’, or exotic dial, Daytona but its phenomenal hammer price came down to one important factor: this was THE ‘Paul Newman’, the watch that was owned by the actor himself and the reason behind the ref. 6239’s ultimate claim to ‘cool’. The good news for all collectors with a few dollars to spend is, that on 12 December 2020, Phillips New York will once again be selling a Rolex Daytona owned by Paul Newman with a pre-sale estimate of ‘in excess of $1m’. This time the watch is a Rolex Cosmograph ‘Big Red’ Daytona ref. 6263 – named for the bright red ‘Daytona’ that appears in an extra-large font, over the sub-dial at six o'clock – that has been consigned by Newman’s daughter, Claire ‘Clea’ Newman Soderlund. According to Paul Boutros, Phillips head of watches, Americas: “For so many reasons, this is one of the most important Rolex watches to ever appear on the market. Throughout his lifetime, Paul Newman was photographed wearing a small handful of Rolex Cosmograph Daytona watches. "Without any doubt, it is this association with Newman that has led to the Rolex Daytona being regarded as possibly the world’s most sought-after wristwatch. Of these, the watch he owned and wore the longest is the present ‘Big Red’ Daytona ref. 6263. The fact that it is being consigned directly by Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman’s daughter, Clea, makes its provenance ‘as good as it gets’ and presents a unique opportunity for collectors.”

  • Politics
    The Daily Beast

    Obama Tells Colbert That Trump ‘Exceeded’ His Worst Nightmares

    More than eight months after he was forced to perform his monologue from a bathtub, Stephen Colbert finally conducted a face-to-face interview. And he couldn’t have asked for a bigger guest.The Late Show host traveled down to Washington, D.C. this week to sit down, at a healthy distance, with former President Barack Obama and talk about his new best-selling memoir A Promised Land and the perilous state of American democracy in the last days of President Donald Trump.“I just want to take a moment to drink you in for just a moment,” Colbert said early in the interview. “Because I’m having to get used to looking at a president again. I’ve gotten out of the habit. I have to warm up for Joe Biden. I don’t want to pull anything when I see him take the oath of office.”Seeming to agree with that assessment, Obama said, “We’ve got the potential of returning to a presidency that is actually paying attention and trying to do right by all people and not just some.”For the most part, Colbert decided to leave the man who is still the current president aside, explaining that he’s talked enough about him over these past four years.More often than not it was Obama who returned to Donald Trump, if not by name, calling out his administration’s “shambolic” response to the COVID-19 pandemic and adding that it’s not “rocket science” to simply take the scientific recommendations seriously.Asked by the host if he was surprised that Republicans didn’t see the “political advantage” of acting like they “cared,” Obama said, “I think that that is a measure of how detached from reality and how embedded ideological and conspiratorial thinking has become, where you’re doing it even when it’s to your disadvantage.”Julia Louis-Dreyfus Mocks Rudy Giuliani in Face-Dripping ‘Veep’ PromoDemonstrating a surprising historical knowledge of Colbert’s career, he added, “In your original show, right, you’re satirizing a certain attitude, but you never thought that folks would actually start believing it.”“I did not know I was a prophet,” Colbert replied. “I thought I was a comedian.”“You couldn’t make up some of the stuff that you’re seeing,” Obama said. “And it is to the detriment of the country, but it also runs contrary to what would have been smart politics if the Republicans wanted to maintain the White House.”“And that in some ways is more troubling because now it’s no longer even strategic,” he continued. “You’re drinking your own Kool-Aid in a way that I think is troublesome. And one of the big challenges that Joe Biden is going to have is to figure out how to puncture that information bubble that, not just Republican officials, but a sizable portion of voters are in right now.”As Trump continues to deny that he legitimately lost to Biden, Colbert reminded Obama about the gracious way he invited his successor into the White House for a meeting and photo-op shortly after the 2016 election. The host said it was a “chilling moment” to watch because he had an “emotional flash” of all the ways Trump could abuse the “dignity of the office” over his first term. “Were you having a similar feeling in that moment?” he asked.“Yeah, it was a concern,” Obama answered. When Colbert asked if those concerns were “borne out,” Obama said they were “exceeded.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

  • Politics
    France 24 Videos

    Trump imposes new rule on some African travellers

    Nationals of 15 African countries will be required to post bonds of up to $15,000 if they want to enter the US, as President Donald Trump brings in tougher conditions before leaving office. But first, Ethiopia's state-run human rights organisation accuses Tigrayan fighters at war with the government of having killed around 600 civilians in ethnically motivated attacks. The ongoing conflict has sent thousands fleeing across the border to Sudan. Finally, we see how activists in Gabon are fighting against the destruction of precious mangroves. 

  • Politics
    Redbook

    In Photos: How Past Presidents Have Turned Over the Keys to the White House

    From Jimmy Carter to Barack Obama, here are pictures of the presidential transition throughout modern history. From Redbook